Posts filed under ‘Shop Local’

Meet the Staff: Cody Madsen

Cody Bio (4)

I’m originally from a small town in California outside of Yosemite National Park in the Sierras. I’ve worked in bookselling for 8 years. In college, I worked seasonally at a small independent in my hometown. I came on as a manager for Book Culture in August of 2013.

What is your role as a Manager for Book Culture?
I’m the Event Coordinator for Book Culture, and help with managing the periodicals, floor managing, and help coordinate web content. I’m a semi-pro gift wrapper, and I also occasionally wear shorts and flip-flops.

How did you come to join the Book Culture family?
I moved to NYC in September of 2011 for graduate school. While waiting to board my plane in California, I sent an email to Book Culture to see if they might be hiring. On a layover in Denver, I received a reply from Chris asking if I could come in for temporary work for the coursebook rush. I got to Manhattan around 3am Sunday morning, and by 11am I was working for Book Culture. I’ve been here in some capacity ever since.

What are your areas of expertise?
I read a little all over the place. I studied cultural anthropology in school, so I can speak to that body of work. I read more contemporary fiction now, with a Tennessee Williams play thrown in every couple of books. I enjoy ‘History of the Book’ books. I read samples of most of the magazines we stock, so I can recommend the heck out of a number of those titles.

What are you currently reading?
I’ve been reading The World According to Garp for a while with some friends from college. It’s definitely something. I also recently just read Prelude to Bruise by Saeed Jones. I’ve started to read more stories, fiction and nonfiction, told from the perspective of non-American women. Some of my favorite authors in this vein are Chinelo Okparanta, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Margery Wolf, and Lisa See. I also follow APOGEE and Hello Mr. magazines for their writing.

What’s your favorite part of working for a bookstore?
The community. Bookselling seems to attract wonderful, insightful, collaborative people. I’ve made lifelong friends through my work in bookstores, and for that I’m especially grateful. My quality of life has been forever enriched. (The discount, advanced copies, and BEA are nice perks, too.)

Advertisements

January 16, 2015 at 3:00 pm Leave a comment

Q&A and Reading with Paula Rizzo

At our Columbus location on Thursday, January 15th, at 7pm, broadcast journalist Paula Rizzo will launch her latest book, Listful Thinking: Using Lists to be More Productive, Highly Successful and Less Stressed.  Introducing Rizzo will be Patty Chang Anker, author of Some Nerve: Lessons Learned While Becoming Brave.

Finding enough hours in the day to get everything accomplished and allow for some downtime can be a struggle, and it has only gotten harder in the past five years. It’s no wonder so many of us are stressed, overextended and exhausted. The Institute of American Stress has discovered that 44% of Americans feel more stressed than they did five years ago, and 54% of all American employees feel overwhelmed, according to a study by the nonprofit Family and Work Institute. Listful Thinking: Using Lists to Be More Productive, Highly Successful and Less Stressed is the book that will give you your life back. Author Paula Rizzo is a television and web producer from New York, and she has applied the tools and techniques that have made her successful at work to the art of list-making. Listful Thinking can be applied to anything in life and almost all situations.

listful

How did you come to write Listful Thinking?
I’ve always wanted to write a book but I never thought it would be about lists! I’ve always been a list maker and a bit of a procrastinator. But my job as a news producer quickly taught me to be more efficient with my time. I wasn’t using the same time-saving tips at home that I used to get things done at work and I noticed a lot of things would fall through the cracks. So when I was looking for an apartment in NYC I created a checklist of all the things I needed to pay attention to. Much like I would at work when I go out on a shoot and need to interview someone. I will write out all the questions I need to ask and do a lot of preparation beforehand. When I did this, it was so much easier to find a great apartment! A friend wanted my list and suggested I start a blog because as she said not everyone thinks this way. So I did and ListProducer.com was born. That was the start of the Listful Thinking journey.

What are you currently reading?
Choose Yourself by James Altucher

Do you have a personal favorite book of all time? If so, can you share it and tell us why?
Oh this is such a hard question. For me this changes all the time. I’m always falling in love with new books. I have a list of course!

Is there anything you are particularly looking forward to the publication of?
Better Than Before by Gretchen Rubin. I’m a big fan of hers and she always comes up with ideas that make you really look at your life and choose to make it better.

Any upcoming book projects in the works that you can tell us about?
I’m still updating my blog ListProducer.com regularly. I’ve created an online PopExpert course based on the book that I’m really excited about. And I’ve been narrating some of my blog posts for the time-saving app Umano, which has really been fun. And I do hope another book or a series comes along at some point.

January 9, 2015 at 1:43 pm Leave a comment

Meet the Staff at 112th: Devon Dunn

Now that you have met some of the wonderful people who work at Book Culture on Columbus, we are ready to introduce the staff at Book Culture’s 112th store! There are quite a few of us, so look forward to many more posts, reading recommendations, and exclusive insights into the workings of an independent bookstore.

Devon Bio

What is your role as a Manager for Book Culture?
In addition to all the usual managerial duties, I’m also responsible for stocking and curating our sidelines, cards, and other non-book products you see at 112th. As a buyer, I try to find fun and interesting products that fit with Book Culture’s aesthetic that I feel will appeal to our customers. It’s a great experience–especially when I can connect with other independent/local companies to bring unique stuff to Book Culture.

How did you come to join the Book Culture family? 
I moved to New York last March after several years in Boston where I worked as a manager and assistant buyer for a locally-owned retailer. When I interviewed with Book Culture, it seemed like an instant perfect fit: independent store, wonderful book selection, and one of the managers at the time even grew up in my hometown!

What are your areas of expertise?
I studied Russian Literature and Translation in college, so I have a lot of Slavic authors who are favorites of mine, and I’m always happy to debate the merits of different translations (for anything, not just Russian-language stuff). Other than that, I’ve been really into reading more female authors, as well as books about Nature, Environment, Urban Foraging, and Cookbooks.

What are you currently reading?
Elena Ferrante! I picked up My Brilliant Friend because I’d heard so much about it, and now I’m eagerly devouring everything she’s written. If you’ve been debating whether or not to read her stuff, do it!

What’s your favorite part of working for a bookstore?
Hands down it’s getting to work with people and products I enjoy. In the age of Amazon, if you’re in a book store, it’s by choice–because you like the atmosphere and comradery that these spaces offer. It’s great to know that I have something in common with pretty much everyone who walks in the door.

January 7, 2015 at 4:00 pm Leave a comment

Don’t Miss Our New Year’s Day Sale & Festivities!

happy new yearPlease join us on New Year’s Day for our Annual New Year’s Day Sale and Festivities! The sale will be held at our Broadway and 112th Stores and everything will be 20% off!  We are also hosting parties on New Year’s Day at our 112th & Columbus Stores! The Seth Myers Trio will start their set at 11:00 am at 112th and Emma Larsson will begin her performance at 11:30 am at Columbus.  We will also be celebrating the new year with a Bagel Breakfast, mimosas, and other snacks.

emma

seth

We hope you have a happy and healthy new year–see you tomorrow!

 

December 31, 2014 at 5:11 pm Leave a comment

Atticus Lish in Conversation with Lynn Lurie December 10th

lish

We are thrilled to have author Atticus Lish read and discuss his first novel, Preparation for the Next Life, at our Columbus store this Wednesday, December 10th, at 7pm.  Lish will be joined in conversation with Lynn Lurie, author of Corner of the Dead, winner of the Juniper Prize for Fiction, and Quick Kills.  Though both writers are based in New York City, critics have pointed out that their books read unlike any typical New York novel.  In Dwight Garner’s rave review of Preparation for the Next Life in the New York Times, he admires Lish’s “intricate comprehension of, and deep feeling for, life at the margins.” And in Jesse Barron’s interview BOMB Magazine, he writes, “It’s been a while since we had a great novel about being poor in New York where poor did not mean broke. The difference between the two conditions may be how reasonably you can hope they’ll change, and Atticus Lish’s Preparation for the Next Life is a book about people hoping to change their lives in a city that will not let them.”

On a related note, Nicole Cliffe’s two part interview with Lynn Lurie in The Toast (check out part I and II), talks about how Lurie’s unconventional writing is influenced and complicated by her time spent living and traveling in rural South America.  While volunteering with the luriePeace Corps in a remote village in Ecuador, Lurie recalls that in witnessing and experiencing intense social and economic inequality,  she “had felt the weight of being less than, of being the other.”  It is precisely the complex “status of the outsider” that Lurie explores through the narrator of Quick Kills.

For more information about Wednesday’s event, be sure to visit our website.

 

 

December 9, 2014 at 6:07 pm Leave a comment

Spotlight on: Izabela Gabrielson

1147022_581668321871971_1346284145_o

We were so pleased today when we opened a box full of hollyhocks, gladioli, carrots and beets, red roosters, crows, a few earnest foxes, and coffee cups, all printed on cards by Izabela Gabrielson. Based in Seattle, Gabrielson is a painter who depicts natural landscapes of the Pacific Northwest, still lifes, as well as adorable portraits of animals.  Gabrielson works primarily in watercolor and ink, and all of the designs on her greeting cards are printed from original watercolor paintings.

winter

photo (8)

Aside from her evocative and vibrant color palette, we love how Gabrielson leaves the sentiment of her cards up for interpretation.  Placing each image against a plain white background, Gabrielson lets each creature speak for itself.  On what occasion will you give someone a midnight blue crow? Or a bunch of winter beets?

photo (7)

photo 3 (1)

Be sure to visit Gabrielson’s etsy store as well as her website to learn more about her work.

December 6, 2014 at 3:08 pm Leave a comment

Small Press Spotlight: Projective Industries

projective_industries_mini2

For this Small Press Spotlight, we are featuring an interview with the three editors of Projective Industries, a small press that publishes beautifully designed, handmade letterpressed chapbooks. We would like to thank the editors for the interview and hope you will come visit our small press table, showcasing unique publications from Projective Industries as well as many other presses locally based in New York City.

Can you tell us a little bit about the history of Projective Industries? When did the press first get started?

Kate McIntyre: Stephanie, you founded it in 2008, right? I became part of it in 2011 because I wanted to learn more about bookmaking, and wanted to be more involved in the small-press poetry community. It was after that that we started letterpressing the covers. Stephanie and I took some classes in letterpress and other printmaking techniques (on the simpler end of the printmaking spectrum) at Spudnik Press Cooperative in Chicago—which is where I’m from, and where Stephanie lives now. I moved to New York a little over a year ago, so now we’re a sort of transcontinental press—last year, while Stephanie was living in Tokyo, we were international! And Karen joined this summer, which is so wonderful.

Stephanie Anderson: Yep, the poet Sam Amadon and I founded the press in the summer of 2008, as we were leaving New York. (I went to Chicago, Sam went to Houston.) I think it was partly founded from the desire to keep in touch with our literary community in New York, which was starting to disperse. But I was also in love with the handmade, with letterpress — I had taken the Center for Book Arts’ emerging writers letterpress seminar, and I was much inspired by Ryan Murphy, who showed me his tabletop Kelsey, on which he made his beautiful one-off chapbooks. Of course, I didn’t manage to acquire a letterpress until 2011 or so, when a brilliant stroke of luck (and the poet Adam Weg) brought me one.

How did you arrive at the name, “Projective Industries”? Does the work you publish reflect what Projective Industries means to you?

KM: Well, Stephanie came up with the name, so her answer is the originary one. But I can tell you my own associations with it. I like the idea that we are an industry; that one thing chapbook-making does is make labor visible. And I like that it’s plural; we’re not doing just one kind of thing, either aesthetically or materially. And, while “projective” recalls Olson’s “projective verse” for me, I like to think that we’re projecting a little farther than that. The work we publish tends to be quite experimental, and the idea that the press is itself about launching (projects or projectiles, take your pick) and about futurity, rather than stasis, is important to me.

SA: I love Kate’s associations, and agree with them. Sam is to be credited with the name itself, I think; he and I made several lists — one column of which was the generic words we could have in the name, like “Books” and “Press,” and I was rather smitten with “Industries” because it emphasized the making of the objects and potentially gave us the freedom to make or do or create things that weren’t books, per se. But the “Projective” was purely Sam, and he was thinking of Olson. I also like the “project” embedded in there — and we do tend to publish chapbooks that are projects, in one way or another. The industry of the poet AND that of the bookmakers.

Karen Lepri: I’ll simply add that for me, the newcomer, “projective” includes the flashing up against a white background, a cinematic element that depends on the reader to organically take the work in and see-feel-hear it. Also, industries–plural! I imagine this multiplicity of makings, of processes that begin in other texts, conceits, forests, fields, threads, needles and so forth.

photo 2 (1)

Above: Obvious Metals
By Leora Fridman

(more…)

November 26, 2014 at 3:27 pm Leave a comment

Older Posts


Welcome!

Book Culture is an independent community bookstore with two locations in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of New York City on 112th street and 114th street and Broadway. Visit us online at www.bookculture.com

People Like Us!

"The Upper West Side's literary standard"
- Gothamist

"Simply beautiful."
- Not For Tourists

Book Culture

Categories

indiebound